GSoC 2017 Ideas

OWASP Project Requests

Tips to get you started in no particular order:

OWASP Juice Shop

[[OWASP Juice Shop Project]] is an intentionally insecure webapp for security trainings written entirely in Javascript which encompasses the entire OWASP Top Ten and other severe security flaws. Juice Shop is written in Node.js, Express and AngularJS. The application contains more than 30 challenges of varying difficulty where the user is supposed to exploit the underlying vulnerabilities. Apart from the hacker and awareness training use case, pentesting proxies or security scanners can use Juice Shop as a “guinea pig”-application to check how well their tools cope with Javascript-heavy application frontends and REST APIs.

Challenge Pack 2017

Brief Explanation:

Ideas for potential new hacking challenges are collected in GitHub issues labeled “challenge”. This project could implement a whole bunch of challenges one by one and release them over the course of several small releases. This would allow the student to work in a professional Continuous Delivery kind of way while bringing benefit to the Juice Shop over the duration of the project.

Coming up with additional ideas for challenges would be part of the project scope, as the list of pre-existing ideas might not be sufficient for a GSoC project.

Expected Results:

Getting started:

Knowledge Prerequisites:

Mentors

Tech Stack Update

Brief Explanation:

Development of OWASP Juice Shop started in 2014 and was based on - back then - quite recent Javascript frameworks and modules:

Several of the above frameworks or modules have moved on to new (runtime incompatible) major releases, namely Angular 2, Sequelize, Frisby and Jasmine. Other modules are out of maintenance entirely, e.g. sequelize-restful.

Migrating the OWASP Juice Shop to the latest versions of the mentioned frameworks & modules is an important step to keep the application relevant as ‘the most modern’ intentionally broken web application. Moving to entirely different frameworks might be taken into considerationas well.

Expected Results:

Getting started:

Knowledge Prerequisites:

Mentors

Your idea

Brief Explanation:

You have an awesome idea to improve OWASP Juice Shop that is not on this list? Great, please submit it!

Getting started

Expected Results:

Knowledge Prerequisites:

Mentors

OWASP Mobile Hacking Playground

The OWASP Mobile Hacking Playground (https://github.com/OWASP/OMTG-Hacking-Playground) is part of the OWASP Mobile universe, which consists at the moment of the following projects:

In order to give also practical guidance to developers, security researches and penetration testers of mobile Apps, a hacking playground was created with the goal to create different mobile App’s that contain different vulnerabilities that map to the MSTG test cases. Every test case described in the MSTG will therefore be implemented in an Android and iOS App. This has two advantages:

It is also encouraged to use the App(s) for education purpose during trainings and workshops.

Creation of Android Code Samples

Brief Explanation:

An Android App that maps to the MSTG test cases is already created. This App contains mostly test cases that are related to data storage on an Android device. In order to close the gap to the MSTG more test cases need to be added that show “bad practices” that lead to vulnerabilites, but also the latest security best practices to demonstrate how vulnerabilites can be mitigated.

For examples of implemented test cases, see the Wiki of the Mobile Hacking Playground: https://github.com/OWASP/OMTG-Hacking-Playground/wiki/Android-App

Expected Results:

The following categories and their test cases are not fully added to the Android App:

For some of the testcases this also includes creating an endpoint on server side in order to fully understand the test case and possible security concerns.

As not all missing test cases can be implemented during the GSOC a subset of them will be defined with the student together.

Getting started:

Here are a few suggestion on how to get started.

Knowledge Prerequisites:

General interest in Mobile and Security. Basic knowledge of Android and Java.

Mentors

Sven Schleier - OWASP Slack: @sushi2k - OWASP Mobile Security Testing Guide and Mobile Hacking Playground Project Leader

Write Mobile Crackmes and De-Obfuscation Guides

Brief Explanation:

A key goal of the OWASP Mobile Testing Project is to build the ultimate learning resource and reference guide for mobile app reversers. As hands-on hacking is by far the best way to learn, we want to link most of the content to practical examples. We’re therefore planning to add crackmes for Android and iOS to the GitHub repo that will then be used as examples throughout the guide. The goal is to collect enough resources for demonstrating the most important tools and techniques in our guide, plus additional crackmes for practicing.

In this project, the student creates multiple cracking exercises for Android and documents solutions to these exercises. The new crackmes developed in this project will be added to the existing list at:

https://github.com/OWASP/owasp-mstg/blob/master/OMTG-Files/02_Crackmes/List_of_Crackmes.md

Possible solutions will be added to the “Reverse Engineering” chapters in the Mobile Testing Guide along the following lines:

https://github.com/OWASP/owasp-mstg/blob/master/Document/0x05b-Reverse-Engineering-and-Tampering-Android.md#symbolicexec

Additionally, the crackmes produced will be used as examples in other sections of the guide, such as test cases.

Expected Results:

Getting started:

Here are a few suggestion on how to get started.

Knowledge Prerequisites:

General interest in Obfuscation techniques, Mobile and Security. Basic knowledge of Android and Java.

Mentors

Bernhard Mueller - OWASP Slack: @bernhardm - OWASP Mobile Security Testing Guide and MASVS Project Leader

OWASP ZAP

OWASP Zed Attack Proxy (ZAP) is one of the world’s most popular free security tools and is actively maintained by hundreds of international volunteers. Previous GSoC students have implemented key parts of the ZAP core functionality and have been offered (and accepted) jobs based on their work on ZAP.

We have just included a few of the ideas we have here, for a more complete list see the issues on the ZAP bug tracker with the project label.

Field Enumeration

This would allow a user to iterate though a set of (user defined) characters in order to identify the ones that are filtered out and/or escaped.

The user should be able to define the character sets to test and will probably need to configure the success and failure conditions, as well as valid values for other fields in the form.

Expected Results

Knowledge Prerequisite:

ZAP is written in Java, so a good knowledge of this language is recommended, as is knowledge of HTML. Some knowledge of application security would be useful, but not essential.

Mentors

Simon Bennetts and the rest of the ZAP Core Team

Scripting Code Completion

ZAP provides a very powerful scripting interface. Unfortunately to use it effectively is only really possible with a good knowledge of the ZAP internals. Adding code completion (eg using a project like https://github.com/bobbylight/AutoComplete) would significantly help users.

Expected Results

Knowledge Prerequisite:

ZAP is written in Java, so a good knowledge of this language is recommended. Some knowledge of application security would be useful, but not essential.

Mentors

Simon Bennetts and the rest of the ZAP Core Team

SSRF Detector Integration

Currently ZAP does not detect SSRF vulnerabilities, due to the lack of this sort of service. https://ssrfdetector.com/ is an online service for detecting Server Side Request Forgery vulnerabilities (SSRF). It is developed and maintained by Jake Reynolds and is open source https://github.com/jacobreynolds/ssrfdetector

Expected Results

Knowledge Prerequisite:

ZAP is written in Java, so a good knowledge of this language is recommended. Some knowledge of application security would be useful, but not essential.

Mentors

Simon Bennetts and the rest of the ZAP Core Team

Zest Text Representation and Parser

Zest is a graphical scripting language from the Mozilla Security team, and is used as the ZAP macro language.

A standardized text representation and parser would be very useful and help its adoption.

Expected Results

Knowledge Prerequisite:

The Zest reference implementation is written in Java, so a good knowledge of this language is recommended. Some knowledge of application security would be useful, but not essential.

Mentors

Simon Bennetts and the rest of the ZAP Core Team

Support Java as a Scripting Language

It would be very useful to support Java in addition to the JSR223 scripting languages within the ZAP script console’.

It should be possible to provide much better auto complete support than will be possible with dynamically typed scripting languages.

Expected Results

Knowledge Prerequisite:

The Zest reference implementation is written in Java, so a good knowledge of this language is recommended. Some knowledge of application security would be useful, but not essential.

Mentors

Simon Bennetts and the rest of the ZAP Core Team

Bamboo Support

ZAP already has an official plugin for Jenkins (https://wiki.jenkins-ci.org/display/JENKINS/zap+plugin).

It would be great if we also had similar integration for Bamboo (https://www.atlassian.com/software/bamboo, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamboo_(software))

Expected Results

Knowledge Prerequisite:

The Zest reference implementation is written in Java, so a good knowledge of this language is recommended. Some knowledge of CI/CD/Bamboo would be useful.

Mentors

Simon Bennetts and the rest of the ZAP Core Team

Backslash Powered Scanner

This is a brand new technique developed by one of the Burp guys: http://blog.portswigger.net/2016/11/backslash-powered-scanning-hunting.html Their implementation is open source: https://github.com/PortSwigger/backslash-powered-scanner so hopefully shouldn’t be too hard to port to ZAP :)

Expected Results

Knowledge Prerequisite:

ZAP is written in Java, so a good knowledge of this language is recommended.

Mentors

Simon Bennetts and the rest of the ZAP Core Team

Your Idea

Brief Explanation:

ZAP is a great framework for building new and innovative security testing solutions. If you have an idea that is not on this list then don’t worry, you can still submit it, we have accepted original projects in previous years and have even paid a student to work on their idea when we did not get enough GSoC slots to accept all of the projects we wanted.

Getting started

Expected Results:

Knowledge Prerequisites:

ZAP is written in Java, so a good knowledge of this language is recommended, as is knowledge of HTML. Some knowledge of application security would be useful, but not essential.

Mentors

Simon Bennetts and the rest of the ZAP Core Team

BLT / Bugheist

Brief Explanation:

Bugheist lets anyone report issues they find on the internet. Found something out of place on Amazon.com ? Let them know. Companies are held accountable and shows their response time and history. Get points for reporting bugs and help keep the internet bug free.

Getting started

Expected Results:

Knowledge Prerequisites:

BLT is written in Python / Django, so a good knowledge of this language and framework is recommended, as is knowledge of HTML. Some knowledge of application security would be useful, but not essential.

Mentors

Sean Auriti and the rest of the BLT Core Team

OWASP Security Knowledge framework

Brief Explanation

The OWASP Security Knowledge Framework is intended to be a tool that is used as a guide for building and verifying secure software. It can also be used to train developers about application security. Education is the first step in the Secure Software Development Lifecycle. This software can be run on Windows/Linux/OSX using python-flask.

In a nutshell

Your idea / Getting started

Expected Results

Knowledge Prerequisites

Mentors

Riccardo ten Cate [mailto:[email protected]] Glenn ten Cate [mailto:[email protected]]

OWASP ZSC

Brief Explanation:

OWASP ZSC is an open source software in python language which lets you generate customized shellcodes and convert scripts to an obfuscated script. This software can be run on Windows/Linux/OSX under python https://www.owasp.org/index.php/OWASP_ZSC_Tool_Project

Getting started

Project Leaders:

Expected Results:

We have a list of potential modules we want to build To get familiar with the project, please check our installation and developer guidelines: https://www.gitbook.com/book/ali-razmjoo/owasp-zsc/details

Contact us through Github, send us a question: https://github.com/zscproject/OWASP-ZSC

Knowledge Prerequisites:

OWASP ZSC is written in Python, so a good knowledge of this language and framework is recommended, as is knowledge of HTML. Some knowledge of application security would be useful, but not essential.

Mentors

Brian Beaudry & Patrik Patel Please contact us through Github https://github.com/zscproject/OWASP-ZSC

OWASP Seraphimdroid mobile security project

Behavioral malware and intrusion analysis

Brief Explanation:

OWASP Seraphimdroid is an Android mobile app which already has a capability to statically analyze malware using machine learning (weka toolkit) relying on permissions. However, this is usually not enough and we intend to improve this with behavioral analysis. There are a number of paper in scientific literature describing how to detect malware and intrusions by dynamically analyzing its behavior (system calls, battery consumption, etc.). The idea of this project is to find the best approach that can be implemented on the device and implement it.

Expected Results:

Knowledge Prerequisites:

Mentors

Framework for plugin development

Brief Explanation:

OWASP Seraphimdroid is well rounded security and privacy app, however, it lacks some components community can provide. We would like to provide community the way to develop plugins that can add features to OWASP Seraphimdroid app. However, the way of integrating external components into Android app may be challenge. The way of presenting GUI and integration between processes need to be examined and developed.

Expected Results:

Knowledge Prerequisites:

Mentors

OWASP DefectDojo

Brief Explanation:

DefectDojo is a security automation and vulnerability management tool. DefectDojo allows you to manage your application security program, maintain product and application information, schedule scans, triage vulnerabilities and push findings into defect trackers.

Expected Results:

Knowledge Prerequisites:

Getting started:

Mentors

OWASP AppSensor

The OWASP AppSensor project is a project to help you build self-defending applications through real-time event detection and response. Previous GSoC students have implemented key AppSensor contributions, and we’ve had very successful engagements. We look forward to hearing your ideas and hopefully working with you to execute them.

Machine Learning Driven Web Server Log Analysis

Brief Explanation:

The goal of this project would be to build a web server log analysis tool suite based on ML (machine learning). This tool suite will accept as input web server logs (apache, nginx) and will provide as output a determination of requests that are considered “attacks” There are a number of key points for this project:

Note that this project would extend work done in last year’s GSOC to get an initial machine learning capability developed.

Expected Results

Knowledge Prerequisite:

AppSensor is written in Java, so a good knowledge of this language is recommended. The toolset used previously for the ML effort was scala/spark, but this is not a hard requirement. The preference would be to use either the JVM (java/scala), or possibly python, as both of these stacks are well understood and have significant ML capabilities.

Mentors

John Melton and the rest of the AppSensor Team

Your Idea

Brief Explanation:

AppSensor is a great tool and many organizations are starting to use it. If you have an idea that is not on this list, please submit it - we would love to give you the chance to work on an idea you came up with!

Getting started

Expected Results:

Knowledge Prerequisite:

AppSensor is written in Java, so a good knowledge of this language is recommended.

Mentors

John Melton and the rest of the AppSensor Team

OWASP OWTF

Offensive Web Testing Framework (OWTF) is a project focused on penetration testing efficiency and alignment of security tests to security standards like the OWASP Testing Guide (v3 and v4), the OWASP Top 10, PTES and NIST. Most of the ideas below focus on rewrite of some major components of OWTF to make it more modular.

OWASP OWTF - MiTM proxy interception and replay capabilities

Brief Explanation:

The OWTF man-in-the-middle proxy is written completely in Python (based on the excellent Tornado framework) and was benchmarked to be the fastest MiTM python proxy. However it lacks the useful and much need interception and replay capabilities of mitmproxy (https://github.com/mitmproxy/mitmproxy).

The current implementation of the MiTM proxy serves its purpose very well. Its fast but its not extensible. There are a number of good use cases for being extensible

Bonus:

Expected Results:

Knowledge Prerequisite:

Python proficiency, some previous exposure to security concepts and penetration testing is welcome but not strictly necessary as long as there is will to learn.

OWASP OWTF Mentors:

Contact: Abraham Aranguren, Viyat Bhalodia, Bharadwaj Machiraju OWASP OWTF Project Leaders

OWASP OWTF - Report enhancements

Brief Explanation:

The current OWTF report is very interactive but it cannot be exported in its current form. A reporter service can be written (which was in the very early releases of OWTF) which exports a nice report with template, findings, and additional pentester’s notes into multiple formats. A small set of export formats should be supported such as:

For background on OWASP OWTF please see: https://www.owasp.org/index.php/OWASP_OWTF

Expected Results:

Knowledge Prerequisite:

Python, React.JS and general JavaScript proficiency, some previous exposure to security concepts and penetration testing is welcome but not strictly necessary as long as there is will to learn.

OWASP OWTF Mentors:

Contact: Abraham Aranguren Viyat Bhalodia, Bharadwaj Machiraju OWASP OWTF Project Leaders

OWASP OWTF - Distributed architecture

To be updated soon!

OWASP OWTF - Off-line HTTP traffic uploader

Brief Explanation:

Although it is awesome that OWTF runs a lot of tools on behalf of the user, there are situations where uploading the HTTP traffic of another tool off-line can be very interesting for OWTF, for example:

This project is about implementing an off-line utility able to parse HTTP traffic:

1) Figure out how to read output files from various tools like: skipfish, hoppy, w3af, arachni, etc. Nice to have: ZAP database, Burp database

2) Translate that into the following clearly defined fields:

3) IMPORTANT: Implement a plugin-based uploader system

4) IMPORTANT: Implement ONE plugin, that uploads that into the OWTF database

5) IMPORTANT: OWTF should ideally be able to invoke the uploader right after running a tool Example: OWTF runs skipfish, skipfish finishes, OWTF runs the HTTP traffic uploader, all skipfish data is pushed to the OWTF DB.

6) CRITICAL: The off-line HTTP traffic uploader should be smart enough to read + push 1-by-1 instead of stupidly trying to load everything into memory first, you have been warned! :)

Why? Because in a huge assessment, the output of "tool X" can be "10 GB", which is *stupid* to load into memory, this is OWTF, we *really* try to foresee the crash before it happens! ;)

CRITICAL: It is important to implement a plugin-based uploader system, so that other projects can benefit from this work (i.e. to be able to import third-party tool data to ZAP, Burp, and other tools in a similar fashion), and hence hopefully join us in maintaining this project moving forward.

For background on OWASP OWTF please see: https://www.owasp.org/index.php/OWASP_OWTF

Expected Results:

Knowledge Prerequisite:

Python proficiency, some previous exposure to security concepts and penetration testing is welcome but not strictly necessary as long as there is will to learn.

OWASP OWTF Mentors:

Contact: Abraham Aranguren Viyat Bhalodia, Bharadwaj Machiraju OWASP OWTF Project Leaders

OWASP Hackademic Challenges Project

[[OWASP Hackademic Challenges Project]] The OWASP Hackademic Challenges project helps you test your knowledge on web application security. You can use it to actually attack web applications in a realistic but also controllable and safe environment.

New CMS

Brief Explanation:

The CMS part of the project is really old and has accumulated a significant amount of technical debt. In addition many design decisions are either outdated or could be improved. Therefore it may be a good idea to leverage the power of modern web frameworks to create a new CMS. The new cms can be written in python using Django.

Expected Results:

’’’ Note: ‘’’ This is a huge project, it is ok if the student implements a part of it. However whatever implemented must be up to spec. If you decide to take on this project contact us and we can agree on a list of routes. If you don’t decide to take on this project contact us. Generally contact us, we like it when students have insightful questions and the community is active

Getting started:

Knowledge Prerequisites:

Python, Django, what REST is, the technologies used, some security knowledge would be nice.

Mentors

Spyros Gasteratos - Hackademic Challenges Project Leaders

Course Type Challenge

Brief Explanation:

We have a sandbox engine which allows for complex guided challenges to be implemented. We’d like to build a challenge that guides the user through a series of steps to an end goal and teaches more information on the subject matter on the way. This is a very open-ended project on purpose to allow creative student to come up with nice ideas. Bellow you will find some examples that we thought might be interesting.

Ideas on the project:

Getting started

Expected Results:

Knowledge Prerequisites:

The technologies used.

Mentors

Spyros Gasteratos - Hackademic Challenges Project Leaders